I’m trying out a new recipe tonight for Bread and Butter Pickles. I have about three flats of quarts and pints worth of dill pickles, so I figured it was high time to try something new. A person can only eat so many dill pickles in a year, and I want something else to fill gift baskets with too. With about 20 cucumber plants kicking out cukes by the dozens every other day, I have more than enough materials to experiment with.

So here’s the recipe I found. (ETA – At the time I found this recipe, it seemed common knowledge because it had been copied word for word in so many places, so that is how I copied it down. See comments to find someone who claims to be the creator, though I have no way to verify her claims.) I have just finished making 6 pints and 5 half-pints (I doubled the recipe), but unfortunately my camera is MIA so there are no pictures.

2 1/2 lbs pickling cucumbers
1 pound white or yellow onions, thinly sliced
1/4 cup pickling salt (can use Kosher salt as a substitute, regular table salt has additives in it that will turn the pickles dark and muddy the color of the pickle juice)

1 1/4 cup white distilled vinegar (5% acidity)
1 cup apple cider vinegar (5% acidity) (Here I omitted apple cider and used 1 cup more of white vinegar due to a shortage)
1 1/4 cups sugar
1 Tbsp mustard seeds
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
3/4 teaspoon celery seeds
1 inch cinnamon stick
6 allspice berries plus a pinch of ground allspice
6 whole cloves plus a pinch of ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1. Carefully rinse the cucumbers, scrubbing away any dirt that may have stuck to the ribs. Slice off 1/8-inch from the ends and discard. Slice the cucumbers in 1/4-inch thick slices, place in a large bowl. Add the sliced onions and pickling salt. Stir in so that the salt is well distributed among the cucumber slices. Cover with a clean tea towel (thin towel, not terry cloth). Cover with a couple of inches of ice. Put in the refrigerator and let chill for 4 hours. Discard ice. Rinse the cucumber and onion slices thoroughly, drain. Rinse and drain again.

2. If you are planning to store your pickles outside of the refrigerator for any length of time, you will need to sterilize your jars before canning, and heat the filled jars in a hot water bath after canning. If you are planning to eat the pickles right away and store them the whole time in the refrigerator, you can skip the water bath step. It’s still a good idea to sterilize the jars first, you can do that by running them through the dishwasher, or placing them in a 200°F oven for 10 minutes. To sterilize the jars for canning, place empty jars on a metal rack in a large, 16-qt canning pot. (Jars must rest on a rack in the pot, not on the bottom of the pot). Fill with warm water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to warm to keep the jars hot and ready for canning. Remove with tongs or jar lifters one by one as you can the cucumbers. Sterilize the lids by bringing a pot of water to a boil and pouring water over a bowl containing the lids.

3. In an 8 quart pot, place the vinegar, sugar, and all of the spices. Bring to a boil. Once the sugar has dissolved, add the sliced cucumbers and onions. Bring to a boil again. As soon as the sugar vinegar solution begins boiling again, use a slotted spoon to start packing the hot jars with the cucumbers. First pack a jar to an inch from the rim with the vegetables. Then pour hot vinegar sugar syrup over the vegetables to a half inch from the rim. Wipe the rim clean with a paper towel. Place a sterilized lid on the jar. Secure with a metal screw band.

4. If you are planning to store pickles outside of refrigerator, process the filled jars in a hot water bath for 10 minutes. Return filled jars to the same canning pot with its already hot water. Water level needs to be at least one inch above the top of the cans. Bring to a boil and let boil hard for 15 minutes, or 20 minutes for altitiudes of 1001 to 6,000 feet. Over 6,000 feet, boil for 25 minutes. Remove jars from pot. Let cool down to room temperature. Jars should make a popping sound as their lids seal. If a lid doesn’t properly seal, do not store the jar outside of the refrigerator.

The whole place smells like pickles now thanks to this venture. Our neighbors are probably wondering what I’m up to. I can’t wait until  few weeks from now to crack one of these open and taste them!

 

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