My goodness! We finally have some weather that resembles spring! It got up to 60 degrees today, and I can actually see patches of our yard and field. There are still a few inches of snow and ice, and a lot more where it got piled up when our neighbor came to help dig us out a couple times. But it’s melting!

In celebration, I stopped at the Goodwill in town today and bought some used golf clubs and foam “practice” balls for the boys. When they get home, we’ll head out and see how far we can hit them down the hill. Thankfully, the balls are neon, so we’ll be able to see them in the snow. What are you doing to celebrate spring?

On a related note, I had to rearrange the plants today. The tomatoes caught up with the peppers in record time. Remember how I started the peppers about 5 weeks before the tomatoes? That’s because tomatoes grow FAST! They are all easily 8-10″ high, except a couple dwarf varieties like the Tiny Tim tomatoes.

Look at this crazy, unruly indoor garden I have going on.

It's a heart! I love you, too, pepper plant.

It’s a heart! I love you, too, pepper plant.

Pepper forest.

Pepper forest.

See where the cotyledon leaves are? They are the bottom-most leaves on each plant. Those will be plucked off and the plant will be buried up to the first set of real leaves when I transplant them into the garden. All those little hairs on the stem are adventitious roots that will grow out into the soil and help to make these plants strong.

See where the cotyledon leaves are on these tomatoes? They are the bottom-most leaves on each plant. Those will be plucked off and the plant will be buried up to the first set of real leaves when I transplant them into the garden. All those little hairs on the stem are adventitious roots that will grow out into the soil and help to make these plants strong.

My little eggplants. They are slow growers, but it looks like they are about ready to be transplanted to solo cups.

My little eggplants. They are slow growers, but it looks like they are about ready to be transplanted to solo cups. Note the yellowing of the leaves on the larger ones – that is because they are becoming root bound in these small cells. When I transplant to a bigger cup, I’ll manually spread the roots around and they’ll green back up in no time.

Rice reaching for the sky!

Rice reaching for the sky!

See if you can count the leaves on each onion. Some already have four! That means the onion has four layers. They're still tiny, but once I transplant them into the garden and start feeding them compost tea... they'll bulb out wicked fast.

See if you can count the leaves on each onion. Some already have four! That means the onion has four layers. They’re still tiny, but once I transplant them into the garden and start feeding them compost tea… they’ll bulb out wicked fast.

 

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