It’s been a while since I’ve updated my blog. We’ve had quite the whirlwind spring so far. First, I’ll let you know what’s going on with the greenhouse. The greenhouse and five acres it sits on are going for $399,000. I applied for a commercial loan through our bank, and they worked so diligently with me to get all of the paperwork filled out correctly. I spent dozens of hours poring over seed and plug catalogs, making elaborate spreadsheets, talking to dealers and the owners, and figuring out every expense we could account for. I submitted the paperwork, but it was at that point that we hit a snag. For a traditional commercial loan, they need a 20% down payment. That’s $80,000. We don’t have $80,000 laying around. So I looked into a small business loan through the SBA. They require a 10% down payment. That’s $40,000. Again… we don’t have $40,000 laying around. We spent weeks selling everything we could, but to no avail. We were only able to raise about $5000 in such a short time.

We were denied a commercial loan because we couldn’t afford the down payment. I talked to the loan officer and she reassured me that as soon as we can come up with $40,000 she would gladly allow me to reapply for consideration.

But where are we going to get $40,000?

We heard of one option that was a bit out there, but workable. We could set up a C-Corp, set up stocks for our personal business, and move moneys from my husband’s 401k over to our own stocks. It sounded too good to be true! He has enough in his 401k, though just barely. After all, we’re only 30 years old. But… as you can probably guess… there is a hitch. It would cost us $5500 to set up the C-Corp and get everything going. Then there would be another $1400 in additional expense, followed by an $1100 annual fee to keep the stocks and paperwork going.

We don’t even have the $8000 we’d need to do that. And even if we did, after discussing it in depth, neither my husband nor I are willing to risk his entire 401k, even to make our dream come true. We need another option.

Back to square one.

I don’t know when or if we’ll be able to come up with $40,000 for a down payment. I know I can turn a good profit and make a good life for our family if we get this greenhouse operation. I know I can do it. I’ve run the numbers several ways. Even after paying for start-up materials, signage, maintenance, the monthly commercial loan payments, advertising, worker wages, taxes, propane, utilities, etc… we’d still make more than what my husband currently makes in a year. And that was on the conservative side. That was only selling half of the stock I could fill the three main greenhouses with in the first year. By the second year, I’d have all 9 greenhouses on line.

But I don’t know where the initial money is going to come from.

It’s true, that old saying about the rich getting richer. Starting a business costs money. If we had just $40,000 for the down payment, I’d already be in the greenhouse getting it cleaned up, putting on new plastic, and preparing it for next spring’s sales. Heck, I might even start earlier and do poinsettias and Christmas wreaths.

What about our house? Our dream house. The one we spent a decade saving up and planning for. Well, we’d love to be able to hang onto it. We could turn it into a rental and retire up here. Or we could sell it. *sigh* I know. It makes me sad to even think about selling something we put so much work into. We looked into it. We’ve had multiple realtors out to assess the value and give us options. We even thought we could come up with the down payment by selling our house and land. The realtors popped that bubble. The sale of our house might give us a tiny profit ($8-10,000), but it wouldn’t be enough. If we could sell our house for the $40k profit, we’d probably do it in a heartbeat and begin a new dream for a new house after the greenhouse was up and running.

So here we are, floating adrift, continuing on with our lives as if the greenhouse operation isn’t going to happen. I had high hopes for a while. I am still hanging onto them in the back of my mind. That greenhouse would mean financial independence. If something were to happen to my husband, I’d still have a way to make a living. It would mean stability – no more moving to follow work opportunities, no more yanking the kids out of their schools and away from their friends. It would be doing something I love every day.

Our last hope now is to keep scrimping and saving. My husband is doing everything he can to see this greenhouse vision through, and I really hope it’s not too little too late. The greenhouse has been on the market 5 years already. Will it stay on the market another year if that’s how long it takes us to come up with the money? I don’t know. My husband has given up the job he loves here, close to home, and has re-enlisted with the company he was previously with. He will be leaving for Afghanistan, to be a contractor in a war zone, within the next few weeks.

I feel sick that he’s making such a sacrifice. He doesn’t have to, but he will. Because he wants a better life for us. He wants financial security. He wants us to have this greenhouse… and this is the only option we seem to have left.

He’s going to be gone for a year. It’s a sure bet that we’ll be able to save up for the down payment in a year of him working over there, but I worry he won’t come back. He’s been over to the Middle East twice before now. We used the money from the previous stints overseas to pay off our debts and buy land, never even thinking we’d have an opportunity like the greenhouse. I was so proud to tell people he’d never have to go back there, back to being awakened in the night by mortars, living apart from everything he knows and loves. I was so glad to have him back. And now… he’s leaving again. For us. For our future. I wish there was another way.

Well, now that I’m damn near close to tears just thinking about him leaving, how about I move onto a more cheerful subject? The garden. I’ve been working hard up until I got sick a couple days ago. It’s all planted, and I’ve been able to keep up with the weeds so far. Once I’m over this sinus infection and chest cold, I’ll get back to work out there again. It’s a big area to keep weeded. In case you don’t remember, our garden is about 7500 square feet, or 8 times the size of our house. Maybe big is an understatement.

Outside, looking in. A view from our driveway into the half-planted garden a couple weeks ago.

Outside, looking in. A view from our driveway into the half-planted garden a couple weeks ago.

Looking in through the front gate to the garden. Everything is still pretty small, but these recent thunderstorms are putting lots of new growth on it all.

Looking in through the front gate to the garden. Everything is still pretty small, but these recent thunderstorms are putting lots of new growth on it all.

The garlic reached full height weeks ago, and is now bulbing out. I'm looking forward to a good harvest in a few weeks, though many of the bulbs will be dried and saved for replanting in the fall. If we get the greenhouse, all this heirloom garlic is coming with me. :)

The garlic reached full height weeks ago, and is now bulbing out. I’m looking forward to a good harvest in a few weeks, though many of the bulbs will be dried and saved for replanting in the fall. If we get the greenhouse, all this heirloom garlic is coming with me. 🙂

Aunt Molly's Ground Cherry. Yep, we have a minor infestation. I'll get out and spray the next dry day we have. Darn bugs.

Aunt Molly’s Ground Cherry. Yep, we have a minor infestation. I’ll get out and spray the next dry day we have. Darn bugs.

Two of over a hundred tomatoes. I still have dozens of plants left. I hate composting perfectly good plants! If you live nearby and want some free heirloom tomatoes, leave a comment or email me. I'd love to see the plants go to a good home.

Two of over a hundred tomatoes. I still have dozens of plants left. I hate composting perfectly good plants! If you live nearby and want some free heirloom tomatoes, leave a comment or email me. I’d love to see the plants go to a good home.

Melons. I swore after last years utter failure with them, I wouldn't try again this year. Gah. Garden addiction  - it's a real thing. I planted 6 varieties.

Melons. I swore after last years utter failure with them, I wouldn’t try again this year. Gah. Garden addiction – it’s a real thing. I planted 6 varieties.

Pumpkins. When I planted them out a few days ago they only had 2-3 leaves. Then it rained. And rained. And rained some more. They're going nuts. Glad I left a good 6' around each of the 8 plants. They look like they're enjoying the mounds of worm castings I planted them in.

Pumpkins. When I planted them out a few days ago they only had 2-3 leaves. Then it rained. And rained. And rained some more. They’re going nuts. Glad I left a good 6′ around each of the 8 plants. They look like they’re enjoying the mounds of worm castings I planted them in.

Peas and carrots. My pea seeds were several years old, so I over-planted thinking I'd get a poor germination rate. Nope! Pretty sure every damn one of them popped up. Gonna have to thin them out.

Peas and carrots. My pea seeds were several years old, so I over-planted thinking I’d get a poor germination rate. Nope! Pretty sure every damn one of them popped up. Gonna have to thin them out.

Cucumbers. I had a few started early. They don't usually transplant well, but these seem to be doing okay. Last year, that was about as big as any of my cukes got all summer. Our soil sucks. Hopefully they'll do better and we can actually get a harvest this year.

Cucumbers. I had a few started early. They don’t usually transplant well, but these seem to be doing okay. Last year, that was about as big as any of my cukes got all summer. Our soil sucks. Hopefully they’ll do better and we can actually get a harvest this year.

Hot peppers! I think these are some Cubanelles. It's like magic. When I planted them, I pinched off all flowers and let them start fresh. Amazing what can grow in a week and a half, isn't it? These plants were ready to go! I put in over 200 pepper plants this year. Think it'll be enough? :D

Hot peppers! I think these are some Cubanelles. It’s like magic. When I planted them, I pinched off all flowers and let them start fresh. Amazing what can grow in a week and a half, isn’t it? These plants were ready to go! I put in over 200 pepper plants this year. Think it’ll be enough? 😀

Two fat rows of onions (red, yellow, white), followed by several of potatoes. Those went in the end of April. Taters and onions laugh in the face of late frosts, as did the garlic. The potatoes are doing so well I might be able to get another batch in mid-summer. We ran out fast last year. Hopefully this will be enough to see us through the winter and even sell some at the farmer's market.

Two fat rows of onions (red, yellow, white), followed by several of potatoes. Those went in the end of April. Taters and onions laugh in the face of late frosts, as did the garlic. The potatoes are doing so well I might be able to get another batch in mid-summer. We ran out fast last year. Hopefully this will be enough to see us through the winter and even sell some at the farmer’s market.

My tiny herb patch. I still have to get some more basils and flowers tucked into it.

My tiny herb patch. I still have to get some more basils and flowers tucked into it.

One of four currant bushes. They put on MASSIVE growth this year. They were planted last year as single, tiny sticks. Crossing our fingers to actually harvest something this year!

One of four currant bushes. They put on MASSIVE growth this year. They were planted last year as single, tiny sticks. Crossing our fingers to actually harvest something this year!

The big, purple flowered bush is mint. Draws in pollinators like crazy, and smells nice too. The three in the back are elderberries. The one little stick is a currant we replanted this spring since it didn't make it last year. (Thanks for standing by your products, Stark Bros! We'll never buy small fruit bushes from another company. Stark is amazeballs.)

The big, purple flowered bush is mint. Draws in pollinators like crazy, and smells nice too. The three in the back are elderberries. The one little stick is a currant we replanted this spring since it didn’t make it last year. (Thanks for standing by your products, Stark Bros! We’ll never buy small fruit bushes from another company. Stark is amazeballs.)

Blueberries, honeyberries, aronia berries, and gooseberries. Look at the next pictures for some close ups of the fruits!

Blueberries, honeyberries, aronia berries, and gooseberries. Look at the next pictures for some close ups of the fruits!

This gooseberry plant is LOADED with fruit!

This gooseberry plant is LOADED with fruit!

See all the tiny, blue blurs? Those are blueberries. Nomnomnom!

See all the tiny, blue blurs? Those are blueberries. Apparently my camera doesn’t like blueberries. But we do! Nomnomnom!

That’s the garden so far. Everything is small because way up north we don’t have a long growing season. It’ll shoot up and amaze me, I hope. Keep checking back for updates! I’ll try to be better about it this summer. Things get pretty hectic with kids home all summer and the homestead needing all sorts of work to stay in order. Maybe my next post will show you how big the orchard is getting. We might actually get some cherries and plums this year! Yahoo!

If you are a gardener, and you’d like to share your blog, please leave a link in the comment. I’d love to see what you’re planting and hear about your experiences playing in the dirt. My garden isn’t enough to sate my addiction – I need more! If I like your blog, I might even add it to my blogroll so I can stalk it. 🙂

 

So things are moving right along on our little homestead. I had Type B Influenza for a week, then the next week I fell off of a ladder and sprained my ankle really bad. More than two weeks later, I’m still getting all swelled up and painful by the end of the day. Guess I’m a slow healer. I missed a lot of work, and I haven’t done a whole lot around the house since I’ve been laid up so much. Hopefully that will change soon.

This past Monday I put my two week notice in at work. I don’t have affordable daycare for our boys, and it’s just too difficult to schedule my hours around my husband’s, especially when he does sea trials on the ships and is gone for days on end. I have been a bit broody lately because of all that. I’ll miss the folks I work with, and interacting with so many people each day.

But…

One of the other vendors at the farmer’s market told me about this friend of his who is trying to sell a greenhouse. At first I thought, “I’ll listen just to humor him. We can’t afford anything huge yet.” I’m an asshole like that sometimes. So I listened. We ran into him at the store and he mentioned it again. My husband expressed an interest, so we swapped phone numbers and I started thinking maybe we could just buy some of the parts and bring the greenhouse up here to our little homestead.

A few days went by and we got a phone call from this friend of the guy at the market. He invited us to his retirement home, where we sat around his dining room table looking at photo albums and discussing the greenhouse. I was floored. This wasn’t just a greenhouse. It was an entire operation – nine full size greenhouses, an apartment, a rental house, an office, two outbuildings for storage, equipment to last us for years, and all in a prime location.

This was big.

I wasn’t prepared for that. We went home and all I could think was, “This is impossible. It’s never going to happen.” Went from an asshole to a negative Nelly. After talking with the hubby about it, we decided it was worth looking into. So today we schedule a trip down to see the place. Oh. My. Goodness. It’s like a dream. It’s pretty run down after being vacant for 5 years, but the potential is definitely still there. Nothing some Round-Up and a lot of hard work can’t clean up. After touring the entire grounds, looking at property lines, and asking a ton of questions, we found ourselves speaking with the realtor in a local pub about financing.

Y’all, we might actually buy this greenhouse.

The main greenhouses. Three 25'x100' heated, ventilated, houses all connected to the other greenhouses by a monorail to make moving plants easier.

The main greenhouses. Three 25’x100′ heated, ventilated, houses all connected to the other greenhouses by a monorail to make moving plants easier.

The main office. Enough room for two checkouts. Lots of shelving for product display. Attached to the main greenhouse pictured above, the potting room, the apartment, a break room, and a public bathroom.

The main office. Enough room for two checkouts. Lots of shelving for product display. Attached to the main greenhouse pictured above, the potting room, the apartment, a break room, and a public bathroom.

Outside back view of the main three greenhouses.

Outside back view of the main three greenhouses.

A two-shelf cart on the monorail in one of the other greenhouses. The end wall of each house has a door that swings open to allow the carts passage into a connected hallway. No more hauling single flats or hanging baskets by hand! The carts change out into four shelves or double rails, too, depending on what is needed.

A four-shelf cart on the monorail in one of the other greenhouses. The end wall of each house has a door that swings open to allow the carts passage into a connected hallway. No more hauling single flats or hanging baskets by hand! The carts change out into two shelves or double rails, too, depending on what is needed.

View of the business from the road. Of course, I'm leaving out some of the main details, like the business sign. We'll be changing the sign anyway if we get it.

View of the business from the road. Of course, I’m leaving out some of the main details, like the business sign. We’ll be changing the sign anyway if we get it.

That’s the big news. It’s still all on the table being worked out, but I’m crossing my fingers. Will you cross yours for us, too? We could use a whole lot of luck right now to get this ball rolling. Oh, the things we could do with this place! We would start slowly, probably only doing the main three greenhouses at first. Then we’d build up from there. Eventually, maybe my husband could even quit his job to work in the greenhouse. I’d love to run this with him!

There’s so much to think about. I’m probably not going to sleep a wink tonight. We should know more in the weeks to come as we talk with our accountant, bank, and a few local zoning and supply folks. It’s going to take a lot to get this operation back in running condition, but we want it so badly we can taste it! Ahh! I’m so excited! It’s pretty much what we were starting to plan on doing here… but it’s all already done and ready.

Wishing and hoping. Wishing and hoping.

I’ll let y’all know more as we get news. Until then, we’ve got some taters and onions that need planting, newly butchered chickens that need eating, and hundreds of plants that need to get out of our loft and into the dirt. I hope this beautiful spring weather keeps coming! No more of that nasty “s” word associated with cold weather. You hear me, mother nature? No more!

Today the hubby and I spent nearly four hours with face masks on and pitchforks in our hands, cleaning out the chicken coop. I kid you not, the straw and poop was mounded 2-3′ high under the roosts. Blehck! Now I see why poop hammocks are so popular. We got around twenty wheel barrows full of poopy, composting straw and sawdust from our 8’x18′ coop with 33 birds. I’d say about half of it was composted already, but hopefully this summer the rest will catch up. We piled it in a corner of the garden and wet it down thoroughly to get it roasting.

The garden will love this free fertilizer. Thanks, chickens!

The garden will love this free fertilizer. Thanks, chickens!

Once the coop was cleaned, I raked it all flat (dirt floor) and spread lime all over. Then I spread a new layer of straw, brought the waterers and oyster shell bin back in, and refilled the nesting boxes with new sawdust. They love their clean coop!

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My husband and our older son also helped get five new fruit trees into the orchard. One of these days I’ll get out there and take stock of exactly what we have. I know we have lots of apples, two plums, seven cherries, and four pears. The cherries and pears are budding and getting flowers now. It’s great to see things coming to life! It took a few days, but we managed to get every tree mulched, pruned, and surrounded by deer-proof fencing.

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You can see almost the whole orchard in that photo above. It takes up most of the south-eastern face of the hill our house sits on. At the bottom of the hill is a low, marshy spot where rainwater always collects. Someday I’d like to clear all the cottonwood and birch out of it to make a small pond. I can imagine geese grazing the hillside in the shade of fruit trees, then taking an evening swim. Ducks, too. It’s probably a good thing the feed store ran out of ducks so quickly every week this spring – I may have got a head start on our duck population otherwise. Someday…

Here is a close up of one of our newest cherry trees. See the leaves? Yay! Spring!

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I also spent a few hours today cleaning up the garden area. I ripped out all of the stout sunflower stalks, then cleaned up the strawberry beds a bit. The strawberries all have a few little new leaves coming up, and the garlic is nearly 5″ tall already. Even the leeks are trying to make a comeback! I thought the remaining leeks were goners after I let the chickens loose in the garden last fall. Those birds ate every one down to the roots. But lo and behold, they’re being resurrected. Here’s a shot of the garlic. I’ve yet to fertilize and mulch it. Maybe tomorrow. The sun is already setting on today, as you can tell by all of these pictures.

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And the rest of the garden… so full of promise!

Goodnight, garden. May you soon wake to find greens and flowers covering your bare naked soil.

Goodnight, garden. May you soon wake to find greens and flowers covering your bare naked soil.

Yesterday was the Spring Equinox, and this year it actually feels like spring! The snow finished melting a few days ago, and the weather has consistently been above freezing during the day. Blue skies and a shining sun are doing a lot to pick up my mood lately. Oh, spring! How I’ve missed you!

The chickens and guineas are enjoying the warmer weather. Their run is finally solidified instead of being a mud wallow. Every morning I go out and toss some scratch for them. Pretty soon their coop will be thawed enough for me to clean out a winter worth of poop and straw. Not even kidding – it’s about 3′ deep in spots. My garden is going to love all the nutrients from the litter.

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And we’re getting eggs once again. Look at the beautiful little presents I find every morning! We’re getting 8-10 a day… and it’s warm enough outside that the eggs aren’t freezing and cracking within minutes of being laid. Yahoo! You’ll notice a ping pong ball next to the eggs. That is there to entice the hens to lay in the nesting boxes instead of on the floor. Seems to work, though sometimes they toss it out and kick it into the corner by the door, where they like to lay. I move it back whenever they do that. Stubborn, sassy birds.

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My seedlings are doing swell. I’m finished with peppers, and have now started on some brassicas, flowers, and more herbs. Here are some picture updates on them:

Borage in the windowsill. Almost enough to make a salad.

Borage in the windowsill. Almost enough to make a salad.

Basil. Mmm. I love rubbing my hands over the leaves - the smell that's released is amazing!

Basil. Mmm. I love rubbing my hands over the leaves – the smell that’s released is amazing!

Peppers. I'll probably have around 500 when all is said and done. Their sales are going to help build a greenhouse, I hope. :)

Peppers. I’ll probably have around 500 when all is said and done. Their sales are going to help build a greenhouse, I hope. 🙂

Onions got their first haircut and were transplanted into larger flats. You should see the massive roots on these things. Most of them are on their fourth leaf, which means the onions themselves have four layers each. Hopefully this means I'll actually get decent sized bulbs this fall.

Onions got their first haircut and were transplanted into larger flats. You should see the massive roots on these things. Most of them are on their fourth leaf, which means the onions themselves have four layers each. Hopefully this means I’ll actually get decent sized bulbs this fall.

This last picture isn’t really homesteading related, but it’s beautiful to me so I’m going to post it anyway. This is our butcher block island in the kitchen after I cleared it off and oiled it up. Every time I oil it, it gets darker, richer, and so much more gorgeous. I love our island, and highly suggest this material to anyone thinking of remodeling a kitchen. Oh my. I just noticed in the picture how dusty our light is. I guess when the oil soaks in I’ll be climbing up onto the island to clean the lights. These lights – they’re amazing, but a lot of maintenance.

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I am spending a couple hours every few days transplanting peppers to their second homes in plastic cups. So far it’s taken me about 6 hours to transplant 147. It seems like a lot of effort to put into some silly little plants, but they appreciate it and will give me strong roots and stalks as a result. In case you missed my post about transplanting seedlings last year, here is how I do it.

First I get my cups ready. I’m doing a bit of experimenting this year since I’ve found that the clear plastic cups are even cheaper than Solo cups on sale. So I’m using up some old stock I stashed from last year, and also some new cups I bought this year. The solo cups are too wide for my use, so I cut off the top inch or so. It doesn’t have to be pretty – the plants don’t care. Cutting off the top lets me stack 18 cups per flat, 21 if I really squeeze them in. Then I cut three holes around the bottom edge of each cup for drainage. Again, nothing fancy – they just need a way to access the water in the tray during watering times.

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Then I mix up sterile potting mix with peat moss and perlite. I run it under the faucet for a few seconds to moisten it, then use a big mixing spoon to stir it up evenly. When the mixture is wet enough to clump when I make a fist around it, but not so wet that water drips from my fist, then I gently scoop it into each cup, leaving the mixture loose and aerated. I don’t press it down at all at this point, but I do stick my index finger into the middle of each cup to create a planting hole for the seedling.

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This year I’m transplanting as soon as the cotyledons (seed leaves) are up and spread, but last year I waited until the first set of true leaves were out. Doesn’t really make a difference when you do it, so long as you take your time and are gentle with the fragile little roots and stems. Squeeze the bottom of each cell to loosen the seed starting mix around the roots. Then ever so gently pinch the base of the tiny stem and pull each seedling out. Immediately tuck them into the hole in the transplant cup, then gently press the mix around the base of the stem.

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Once all of the cups in a tray are filled, planted, and labeled clearly, they go upstairs to the grow racks I made. They’re simple structures. So easy, a caveman could make them. They’re just shelves between four supports, leveled and screwed in place. Cheap shop lights hang from screwed-in J hooks and chains. This makes them adjustable, which is necessary because the light should always be 1-2″ above the top of the plants to prevent legginess. No, you don’t need the expensive grow lights. I’ve used the cheapest bulbs I can find and had sturdy, healthy plants.

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Pardon the mess. We’re in the process of finishing the loft, where the grow shelves will reside until spring planting. I can’t imagine why, but my husband doesn’t seem fond of the idea of 8′ tall grow shelves in the living room this year. Who knows? Maybe he actually wants to watch movies on his new tv in the corner. Maybe he wants to be able to walk through the living room without having to shimmy around grow shelves. Husbands… they’re so picky. 😛

Other than the peppers, the onions and herbs are doing splendidly. The onions are just about ready for their first haircut and a bit of straightening up.

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This is the first year out of several that I have planted rosemary and actually had some results! I don’t know if you can see it in the top left of the second picture, but there are two tiny rosemary seedlings. I had three, but one bit the dust. I’ve started taking some of the herbs, especially the basil you see on the bottom of the bottom picture, and putting them into assorted pots for sale. They smell sooo good when I play with them! I can’t wait to have fresh basil again.

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These pots shown above each have three different types of basil – Italian, cinnamon, and opal purple. I bought some plain little self-watering pots so people can grow them on a patio or in a windowsill. The plants trying to overshadow them are my indoor spider plant and goldfish plant. Can you see the little, goldfish-shaped, orange flowers on the right? The whole plant is about ready to be loaded with them. It blooms constantly. I originally got the plant from my aunt, but in my ignorance I left it outside over winter. I thought it would just come back like a perennial. Nope. Thankfully, my mom saw my mistake and took a cutting before it was too late. She propagated her own, and gave me a cutting of it when I complimented hers. It’s so neat to see a little plant trimming take off into a full grown plant in its own right. Nature is awesome.

Not much else going on on our little homestead. The snow is nearly all gone, and the ground is nearly thawed completely. Crazy what a week can do. Last week it was -23… this week it’s in the 40’s. I’m still crossing my fingers for an early spring. I’d love to get the garden planted before mid-June this year! I’m behind on my seed starting thanks to the peppers hogging the heat mats, but hopefully I’ll get back on track this week. I still have to start eggplants, broccoli, cauliflower, marigolds, a few more herbs, and some other flowers. Then in April, I’ll start the tomatoes, melons, squash, and another round of herbs.

What are you starting? How’s it going?